NATIVE AMERICANS OF LINCOLN PARISH

Evidence of the first Native Americans in Louisiana is from the Folsum Culture dating 8,000 to 7,000 years BC. Several later cultures followed this first inhabitation, including Scottsbluff, Poverty Point, Tcula, Marksville, and Baytown. However, it was not until about 750 AD that Native Americans were in Lincoln Parish. 

An example of stone tools made by Native Americans tribes who lived in the Lincoln Parish area. 

An example of stone tools made by Native Americans tribes who lived in the Lincoln Parish area. 

Artifacts found at Lincoln Parish sites show that our earliest residents were members of the Caddoen Culture (750–1700 AD), Coles Creek Culture (800–1000 AD), and Ouachita (100–1700 AD). These cultures were centered on the Red and Ouachita Rivers and overlapped into the North-Central Parishes along smaller streams. 

Native American villages in Lincoln Parish were relatively small, probably numbering from 10 to 50 in a group. Known sites are located along Bayou D’Arbonne, Cypress Creek, Big Creek, Moncrief Creek, and Choudrant Creek. 

An example of the clay pottery that can be seen in the museum's permanent collection. 

An example of the clay pottery that can be seen in the museum's permanent collection

Their villages were always located near a good source of water, but also on high ground to avoid flooding. Huts were made of small trees (poles) with sticks, bark, grass, and mud woven in the small cracks and covered with animal skins. Survival was dependent on hunting, fishing, limited agriculture, and gathering native fruits, berries, and buts. Their clothes were made from animal skins.

Arrow points were small and referred to as “bird points.” This arrow was used on all game in the area. Various tools were made of bone, wood, shell, and stone. 

The use of clay pots was quite extensive. These vessels were made of native clay and baked in a fire to harden. Various sizes and shapes were molded and used to carry water, for storage of seeds or food, and for cooking. Broken pieces of pottery are the most common artifacts found at village sites. Unfortunately, very few complete pots are now found.